Q&A with Julia Duin, Alumni Award Recipient

Q&A with Julia Duin, Alumni Award Recipient

This year is the third year the Iceland Writers Retreat has offered the Alumni Award. This prestigious award is funded in its entirety by generous IWR alumni and friends. It gives its recipients full or partial funding to attend the next Retreat, which will take place April 11 to 15, 2018 in Reykjavik. The winners are chosen based on both merit and financial need, and submissions were reviewed by IWR alumni volunteers. We received over 700 applications from around the world and the quality of submissions was extremely high. Over the coming weeks, we will be posting Q&A’s with this year’s recipients of the Alumni Award, with today’s interview being with Julia Duin. You can also read the responses from Fatin Abbas,  Puja Changoiwalaand Nora Shychuk!

Julia Duin is a Seattle-based journalist who has worked as a reporter or editor for everything from the Houston Chronicle to the Washington Times. She’s also written extensively for the Washington Post Sunday Magazine for which she just came out with a nearly 6,000-word profile on President Trump’s advisor Paula White. She’s published six books, the latest being In the House of the Serpent Handler, a nonfiction work about 20-something Appalachian pentecostal serpent handlers who use Facebook to publicize their exploits. During the 2014-2015 academic year, she occupied the Snedden chair as a journalism professor at the University of Alaska/Fairbanks.

How did you find out about Iceland Writers Retreat originally?

Sometime last September, I was skimming an alternative journalism site — I think it was IJNet.org — when it caught my eye.

Have you ever participated in a similar kind of retreat? If yes, how did the experience benefit your writing? 

The writer’s retreat I attended was in the spring of 1978, literally 40 years ago. But I’ve been on other kinds of retreats and they’re wonderful for clearing your mind. I need at least 24 hours to dismiss exterior thoughts and concentrate on the matter at hand, which is why weekend retreats do me little good. I’ve no sooner quieted down when I have to return to the rat race.

As a journalist, does your writing process differ at all when it comes to your creative writing?

It’s night and day. As a reporter, you’re in react and deadline mode plus there are always space limitations. I’ve done academic writing as well where you have to footnote nearly every sentence. As for creative writing, I’ve not been able to do much of it in the past 30 years. But when I have been writing a story story or novel, I’ve had to withdraw for several days to get the mental space to think things out. For one book, I rented out a yurt for several days in the Nantahala National Forest in western North Carolina just to be alone. However, after I adopted a child 11 years ago, my ability to go somewhere quiet shrank to nil.

What are you most looking forward to about the Retreat?

The international character of it intrigues me. I’m looking forward to meeting the many folks attending this retreat and yes, having it be in Iceland definitely adds to the allure.

What and/or who do you find inspiring?

Classical music really helps me think and dream. The Russian romantics are the best but in recent years, Philip Glass has inspired me more. A time of prayer and Bible study early in the day sets my interior clock to what’s most important and it’s during those times that creative thoughts often come. Although British writers like Tolkien and C.S. Lewis have always helped me dream, lately I’ve taken to looking at photo books of landscapes to help me think. I spent 2014-2015 teaching in Alaska and I find that gazing at Arctic scenes gets my thoughts out of the daily news rush into more eternal concerns. And in the past 3 years, my daughter and I have become avid consumers of any movie by Hayao Miyazaki and similar Japanese anime fantasies that have a whole different take on reality. I love their creativity.

How has writing influenced your life?

Since I have been making my living as a journalist for nearly 40 years (currently I blog thrice weekly for the blog getreligion.org and write for various other publications), writing has *been* my life. After taking second place in a writing competition as a sixth grader, I knew I had it within me to excel, so I quit ballet lessons (which I loved) and concentrated on writing during middle and high school years. Like Eric Liddell from “Chariots of Fire” who said that when he runs, he feels God’s pleasure, I feel the same sense of blessing when I write. Journalism is such a great way to bring about social justice and to elevate the deserving and expose the corrupt. I was able to do so while being on the religion beat for various newspapers. It’s one of the few occupations that gives you instant power, which is why it’s hard for many of us to give it up and move on to other kinds of writing. With so much information overload these days, one must invest in many hours of quiet to get the quality of writing and wisdom that the world so badly needs. We are the distillers of wisdom and insight for the world. Good writing is not cheap and it will cost us everything.

What do you find to be your biggest challenge in your writing life?

Being a single parent is very tough. Children constantly need you for all sorts of things; they have a way of demanding your attention when you’re thinking through a phrase or on deadline, so your concentration is always fragmented. If I stay up late to get things done, then I miss out on sleep. My best friend in this is my laptop, which I can take wherever I go and on which I can write as fast as I want. Notepads seem intolerably slow.

Any final comments you’d like to share with our followers?

I’ve published six books and will be working on my seventh during the retreat. Writing one is like being in touch with another world and sensing what will be important in the coming years. My books have grown from a time when I’ve sensed a shift in society or an undercurrent that no one is writing about but which is very much there. I start by taking notes on what I’m noticing and feeling. I see conversations on Facebook about it; I see people groping for what they cannot explain. A book is conceived when that same idea begins to burn in you and your circumstances work out to where you can learn more of this thing or you encounter just the right people who can guide you. Writing is very mystic in that sense. You have to be attuned to the tremors of a movement long before others have noticed it. My fourth book was about large amounts of committed believers who were leaving church. I knew it was happening but no one was writing about it. I began to research this and the book came out two years later. In that year and for two years afterwards, 20 books were published on the same or a similar theme. Writers had felt the zeitgeist of this trend and were able to catch the wave as it crested. One of the most important parts of being a writer is having your ear to the ground, sensing what is to come and discerning a response that will benefit readers when events take place. A good writer is part prophet.

Q&A with Puja Changoiwala, Alumni Award Recipient

Q&A with Puja Changoiwala, Alumni Award Recipient

This year is the third year the Iceland Writers Retreat has offered the Alumni Award. This prestigious award is funded in its entirety by generous IWR alumni and friends. It gives its recipients full or partial funding to attend the next Retreat, which will take place April 11 to 15, 2018 in Reykjavik. The winners are chosen based on both merit and financial need, and submissions were reviewed by IWR alumni volunteers. We received over 700 applications from around the world and the quality of submissions was extremely high. Over the coming weeks, we will be posting Q&A’s with this year’s recipients of the Alumni Award, with today’s interview being with Puja Changoiwala. You can also read the responses from Fatin Abbas and Nora Shychuk!

Puja Changoiwala is a Mumbai-based independent journalist, and author of the widely-acclaimed true crime book in India, ‘The Front Page Murders.’ This book, Puja’s debut work as an author, is recipient of awards and unanimous acclaim from the most reputed quarters of the country. As a journalist, Puja is a contributor to some of the most esteemed news publications in India, Europe, and North America. Her writings have featured in The Guardian, BBC, among other renowned outlets. Previously a human rights correspondent with a London-based political magazine, Puja has also worked as a senior crime correspondent with Hindustan Times, a leading Indian national daily. She has produced award-winning work, covering Mumbai’s sins, and their casualties.

How did you find out about Iceland Writers Retreat originally?

I learnt about the Retreat through a post on the website of the International Journalists’ Network. In an instinct, I knew I had to apply for the Alumni Award. The opportunity seemed surreal – a five-day writing program in Iceland, which includes small-group workshops with some of the greatest stalwarts of the writing world. Plus, it hosts cultural tours with a focus on Iceland’s literary heritage. The program seemed like a perfect fit – it would enrich the writer as well as journalist in me. I’d be over the moon if I won this opportunity, I thought. And with the full scholarship I’ve been awarded, I’m now on my lunar expedition!

Have you ever participated in a similar kind of retreat? If yes, how did the experience benefit your writing?

I’m afraid I haven’t attended a Retreat before – but now I’m guessing it was worth the wait!

As a journalist, does your writing process differ at all when it comes to your creative writing? 

I’m not sure if it differs per se, but I do think that being a journalist certainly adds to one’s approach as a writer. In my opinion, more than the skill of writing, all of creative script is about thoughts that make your readers think – to say something beautifully, you have to have something beautiful to say. And as a journalist, I feel you own a treasure trove of such ideas since you’re well-acquainted with the world – you’ve seen its highs, its downfalls, and the people in those stories. You’re equipped with your interpretations of the world, and when you put them down on paper, you’re bound to create magic – more often than not.

What are you most looking forward to about the Retreat?

This year’s theme – Literary fiction, Non-fiction & Memoir – perfectly complements my interest since I am a true crime writer. Although fiction remains a more lucrative genre worldwide, I believe there are several true stories, which essentially need to find their audience. And I’m certain that interacting with some great minds from the non-fiction space at the Retreat will not only strengthen this belief, but also fuel my passion further for the craft. I believe that it’s only unreasonable passion, which truly drives a writer.

Also, I’ve been scouring through the workshop details lately, and I’m amazed at the eclectic mix of subjects to be covered – so contemporary, so integral to writing, and just so fascinating. I’m also looking forward to the cultural tours. Reykjavik, I understand, is world’s first non-native English speaking UNESCO City of Literature, and I’m certain that it’ll leave me with several things to think about, speak about, and write about.

What do you find inspiring?

Lately, I think commercial art, which imitates life. I believe that as humans, we thrive on escapism and fantasies. That’s why, successful art today mostly comprises of stories and depictions, which transport you to an alternative reality. And that’s also probably why it’s so difficult to blend truth with commerce. I think, for me, any form of art, which manages to create an audience for reality, is inspiring.

It could be a book, like Truman Capote’s In Cold Blood. It could be a stage play, a photograph, a news story, or a painting. It could even be a film – for example, there was recently an Indian movie called Toilet, a comedy-drama about a woman, who threatens to leave her husband if he doesn’t agree to build a toilet in their house. Upon getting married, the woman realizes that her husband’s home doesn’t have a toilet, and that she would have to defecate in the fields to relieve herself. The film, which grossed 20 million USD at the box office worldwide, creatively created awareness about one of the most pressing issues of contemporary India – open defecation and sanitation.

How has writing influenced your life?

At the most basic and most important level, writing has taught me how to pay attention. It has made be a better audience of the world. When you write, you read better, and you watch better. You do these things academically – trying to decipher the mind of that content’s creator, hoping to learn from it. You listen more intently to people; you observe their body languages – hoping to understand their psychology, find your characters in them. And you go about life more awake, and more alive. Ironically, all these things that writing does to you, in turn, make you a better writer!

What do you find to be your biggest challenge in your writing life?

That I’m way too attached to facts!

Any final comments you’d like to share with our followers?

From whatever I’ve learnt so far, I know that writing is neither about the art nor the craft. It’s all about finding one’s voice. If you’re there in the mind, you’ll go there in the body, and your readers will follow.

Q&A with Nora Shychuk, Alumni Award Recipient

Q&A with Nora Shychuk, Alumni Award Recipient

This year is the third year the Iceland Writers Retreat has offered the Alumni Award. This prestigious award is funded in its entirety by generous IWR alumni and friends. It gives its recipients full or partial funding to attend the next Retreat, which will take place April 11 to 15, 2018 in Reykjavik. The winners are chosen based on both merit and financial need, and submissions were reviewed by IWR alumni volunteers. We received over 700 applications from around the world and the quality of submissions was extremely high. Over the coming weeks, we will be posting Q&A’s with this year’s recipients of the Alumni Award, with today’s interview being with Nora Shychuk. You can read Fatin Abbas’ responses here.

Nora Shychuk is a graduate of University College Cork in Ireland, where she received an M.A. in creative writing. Her B.A., from Jacksonville University, is in Screenwriting and English. Her work has appeared in several literary journals and magazines, including The Lonely Crowd and Pact Press’ Speak and Speak Again anthology. Her short story, Separations, was shortlisted for the 2017 From The Well Short Story Competition in Ireland. Last year, Nora was a finalist for the Iceland Writers Retreat Alumni Award and couldn’t be more pleased to be one of the recipients this year. She is an assistant editor for Regal House Publishing and is currently finishing up a short story collection. She lives in New York City.

How did you find out about Iceland Writers Retreat originally?

I found out about the Iceland Writers Retreat through my writing mentor, Mary Morrissy. She sent out an e-mail plugging the Aerogramme Writers’ Studio website to graduates of University College Cork’s creative writing M.A. program. I spent some time trolling the site for writing opportunities, and the Iceland Writers Retreat was listed and open for applications. I read about the retreat and it seemed like a chance of a lifetime: five days in Iceland to write and workshop and explore. I applied in 2016 for the first time and was a finalist for the full 2017 Alumni Award. I promised I’d apply again the next year, and happily, I was one of two recipients of the full 2018 Alumni Award.

As someone who has previously been a finalist for the Alumni Award, did you have a different process when applying again?

When I applied for the Alumni Award again this year, I actually didn’t have a different plan or process in mind. I wanted to be as truthful to myself as possible and supply the judges with strong writing that spoke for itself. Something that did change, however, was my location. I left Florida and moved, permanently, to New York City to be closer to the literary world. I wanted to make that a focal point of my application because the move showed devotion and a strong commitment to my craft.

Have you ever participated in a similar kind of retreat? If yes, how did the experience benefit your writing?

No. I was awarded an Emerging Writer Residency with the Wellstone Center in the Redwoods in California in 2016. Unfortunately, I was still studying abroad in Ireland at the time and the expense was too great to attend. I have workshopped throughout my writing career, within fiction courses at UCC and, more recently, with a writing group in Brooklyn, but the IWR will be an exciting experience filled with new landscapes and fresh inspiration.

Do you feel as though your work as an editor has an impact on your writing process?

My work as an editor absolutely impacts my writing process, although not at first. If I have an idea, particularly one that I feel I need to write, I tend to work fast and messy. I give in completely to curiosity, freedom, imagination, and emotion. I believe in character, tone, and feeling above all else and ignore technicalities. But once I emerge from the telling of the story and look at my (crazy) first draft, I’m serious about making it as necessary and neat as possible. I think a sense of brevity in fiction is important. A story must say something and take the reader along with it. When I’m editing a piece of creative writing, clear direction and concise storytelling are crucial. I ask myself: what can I cut? What can I tighten? What is needed and what is expendable? Editing trains the eye.

What are you most looking forward to about the Retreat?

I could go on and on. The Iceland Writers Retreat provides me with the opportunity to take workshops with writers I know and love and respect. I trust in listening. I count on being wrong and welcome a learning curve. So much of writing is finding your own path to creativity and trusting in the way you tell your stories. No two writers are alike, not really, and the Iceland Writers Retreat has put together a dynamic and diverse faculty of writers to learn from. I am also ecstatic about traveling to Reykjavik—duh!—and experiencing a country and culture for the first time. I have a traveler’s heart and thrive on adventure. The best work I’ve done in my life has been a result of movement, of going to new places and diving right in to something alien and unrecognizable. Iceland is wild and wonderful—and I’m sure it’ll leave its mark on me.

What and/or who do you find inspiring?

Great art. It doesn’t matter what kind. When I read George Saunders’s Tenth of December, I realized the limitless possibilities of the short story. It made me want to sit down, skip meals, write, and never stop. Last fall, I was similarly stunned and after seeing Moonlight. Barry Jenkins created a movie that was truly unlike anything else I’d ever seen. It made me believe in movies again, in their ability to alter, stun, break your heart, and put it back together again.  I was speechless.

And the power of fresh air! A nice, quiet walk in the woods or a challenging hike takes me away and clears my head. It just helps. I always feel at home outdoors; there is a tremendous sense of belonging. As an anxious person prone to stress, being outside helps me to slow down and see the big picture. It’s a natural stress-killer for me.

Human-wise, my partner, Trey, inspires me more than any other person on the planet.  His kindness is unmatched and he is legitimately the funniest person I know. A writer himself, he understands the soul-crushing terror often associated with creative life and still, he has always urged me to look inside myself and go after whatever makes me come alive. I wouldn’t know how to listen to my heart if it wasn’t for him.

How has writing influenced your life?

For me, writing has been an elixir to a full and happy life. Yes, writing is hard. Yes, it scares me. Yes, some days I feel incredibly uninspired and hate everything I do—but! and it’s a big one—I love writing for exactly the same reasons: the challenge, its ability to throttle me, its unpredictability. I’ve never quite understood the tortured artist mentality. Why let something so freeing destroy you? Writing constantly demands that I tap into a creative and playful place, in search of answers or, better yet, questions. It doesn’t have to be perfect and neither do I. Oh, and the really cool thing? Art makes me feel shamelessly alive. Awake. In a constant state of awe. That sense of wonder, of course, has influenced my life all for the better. Writing provides me with the “OK” to look at myself and the world around me and find my own, unique path through it all. In short, writing keeps the magic alive.

What do you find to be your biggest challenge in your writing life?

This stands in almost direct opposition to my last statement, but I believe both can be true. While I know that I don’t have to be perfect, perfectionism is hard to shake when you’re trying to make something “good.” Every sentence must count, right? I’m quite hard on myself when it comes to writing. Ask anyone who has ever worked with me. Ever. I’m neurotic and worrisome, so much so that I’ll stall or stop myself from completing a project. At times, I count myself out before I even really get started. I think all writers struggle with this: the fear, the doubt, the second-guessing. It’s a roadblock we all have to find our own way around. More than one person has told me that I wear my heart on my sleeve and “care too much.” It’s a challenge for me to relax with writing, to be patient and faithful in the process because I’m too afraid that I’ll fail. But the only real failure in writing is not writing. I try to remind myself daily that I don’t need to rise to such lofty, unrealistic expectations of myself and my work. Steinbeck said it best: “And now that you don’t have to be perfect, you can be good.”

Final Comments

As someone who has had their fair share of artistic heartache, I really want to address anyone and everyone who has ever felt discouraged or rejected. Writing is a challenging but worthwhile way to spend your life. It’s a business of no and not yet, but it’s also a business of hope and inexplicable opportunity. Anything can happen in the wonderful and baffling world of creativity, so write what you want to write. Speak up. Be brave. The world needs unique and passionate voices. If you want to write, then write. Keep trying, even when you fail. Especially when you fail. Take every chance available to you because, even though it’s tough and scary out there, writing takes you to amazing places.

Q&A with Fatin Abbas, Alumni Award Recipient

Q&A with Fatin Abbas, Alumni Award Recipient

This year is the third year the Iceland Writers Retreat has offered the Alumni Award. This prestigious award is funded in its entirety by generous IWR alumni and friends. It gives its recipients full or partial funding to attend the next Retreat, which will take place April 11 to 15, 2018 in Reykjavik. The winners are chosen based on both merit and financial need, and submissions were reviewed by IWR alumni volunteers. We received over 700 applications from around the world and the quality of submissions was extremely high. Over the coming weeks, we will be posting Q&A’s with this year’s recipients of the Alumni Award, starting with Fatin Abbas!

Fatin Abbas was born in Sudan, grew up in New York, and attended university in the UK and US. She is a graduate of the Hunter College (CUNY) MFA in Creative Writing Program, winning during her time there the Bernard Cohen Short Story Prize and the Miriam Weinberg Richter Award. Her fiction has appeared in Freeman’sThe Warwick Review, and Friction, and her non-fiction and review essays have appeared in Le Monde DiplomatiqueThe NationAfrica is a Country, and openDemocracy.net. She is a recipient of the Miles Morland Foundation Writing Scholarship, and is at work on her first novel, The Interventionists.

How did you find out about Iceland Writers Retreat originally?

I found out about the Retreat through the Aerogramme Writers’ Studio. Spending a week in Iceland writing and engaging with such renowned authors seemed like an amazing opportunity, and I applied immediately. I’m really grateful for the chance to connect with a community of writers in such a beautiful country.

Have you ever participated in a similar kind of retreat? If yes, how did the experience benefit your writing?

No, I haven’t participated in a retreat before, so I’m really excited to be taking part in this one!

What are you most looking forward to about the Retreat?

I think what the Iceland Writers Retreat offers is this wonderful combination of location, contact with stellar authors, and community. The combination of location and literary community is especially appealing to me. I really look forward to meeting Icelandic authors and learning more about the country through its writers and its literature.

What and/or who do you find inspiring?

In terms of my own writing, there are different streams of inspiration. 19th century novelists — Leo Tolstoy, George Eliot, Jane Austen, Thomas Hardy, Fyodor Dostoevsky — were my gateway into the novel. Postcolonial authors, from Chinua Achebe to Tayeb Salih to Jean Rhys and Arundhati Roy, are very important to me, in the way that they reflect my own relation to the world. Then there are the writers whom I’ve had the privilege to know and learn from: Peter Carey, Colum McCann and Claire Messud, whom I studied with, are all hugely inspiring both as writers and as people. But before all of these writers came along there were my parents. Both are big readers, and they passed on their love of books to me.

How has writing influenced your life?

Writing is the medium through which I’ve always made sense of myself and of the world around me. I became really involved with writing as a child, around the age of nine, when my family first moved from Sudan to the United States. I think it’s no coincidence that I became involved with writing then, because my family was going through so much upheaval. Writing provided a space through which I could make sense of all these changes: new country, new culture, new challenges. As an adult writing continues to play that role in my life. There’s a phrase that Colum McCann, by way of John Berger, uses to describe himself: ‘I’m a patriot of elsewhere.’ That phrase is very apt in terms of capturing my own experience as someone who exists between places and cultures. Writing for me is about figuring out what that ‘elsewhere’ is, what it means to be a citizen or a patriot of that place which is no place and every place. I think it’s the task of writers to think about it, especially given the current political environment, in which there is this buckling down on nationalism and on borders, and when the privileges of citizenship and belonging are distributed so unequally. I like to think of that ‘elsewhere’ as another alternative, a more inclusive, open and equal one, and writing is my way of exploring that place.

What do you find to be your biggest challenge in your writing life?

Time is a big challenge, I think it always is for writers. Writing is a slow process, and we live in a world of hurry. You need time to read, think, write, re-write, revise, to grow into your own wisdom as a person and as a writer. It can be challenging to slow down, to take your time for the benefit of the work, when everyone and everything around you is speeding by. But I think this is also why I value writing: for the way that it forces me to confront my own limitations, the limitations that time imposes on me, and to work through them. Writing is humbling, but at the same time it opens me up to my fullest possibilities.

Any final comments you’d like to share with our followers?

Only a quotation from E.L. Doctorow, another writer I love, which has kept me going through my first novel, and which some of the first-time novelists out there may find encouraging: ‘[Writing a novel is] like driving a car at night: you never see further than your headlights, but you can make the whole trip that way.’

 

Four Recipients of 2018 Iceland Writers Retreat Alumni Award

Four Recipients of 2018 Iceland Writers Retreat Alumni Award

This year is the third year the Iceland Writers Retreat has offered the Alumni Award. This prestigious award is funded in its entirety by generous IWR alumni and friends. It gives its recipients full or partial funding to attend the next Retreat, which will take place April 11 to 15, 2018 in Reykjavik. The winners are chosen based on both merit and financial need, and submissions were reviewed by IWR alumni volunteers. We received over 700 applications from around the world and the quality of submissions was extremely high.

Full Award recipients:

Puja Changoiwala is a Mumbai-based independent journalist, and author of the widely-acclaimed true crime book in India, ‘The Front Page Murders.’ This book, Puja’s debut work as an author, is recipient of awards and unanimous acclaim from the most reputed quarters of the country. As a journalist, Puja is a contributor to some of the most esteemed news publications in India, Europe, and North America. Her writings have featured in The Guardian, BBC, among other renowned outlets. Previously a human rights correspondent with a London-based political magazine, Puja has also worked as a senior crime correspondent with Hindustan Times, a leading Indian national daily. She has produced award-winning work, covering Mumbai’s sins, and their casualties.

Nora Shychuk is a graduate of University College Cork in Ireland, where she received an M.A. in creative writing. Her B.A., from Jacksonville University, is in Screenwriting and English. Her work has appeared in several literary journals and magazines, including The Lonely Crowd and Pact Press’ Speak and Speak Again anthology. Her short story, Separations, was shortlisted for the 2017 From The Well Short Story Competition in Ireland. Last year, Nora was a finalist for the Iceland Writers Retreat Alumni Award and couldn’t be more pleased to be one of the recipients this year. She is an assistant editor for Regal House Publishing and is currently finishing up a short story collection. She lives in New York City.

Partial Award recipients:

Fatin Abbas was born in Sudan, grew up in New York, and attended university in the UK and US. She is a graduate of the Hunter College (CUNY) MFA in Creative Writing Program, winning during her time there the Bernard Cohen Short Story Prize and the Miriam Weinberg Richter Award. Her fiction has appeared in Freeman’sThe Warwick Review, and Friction, and her non-fiction and review essays have appeared in Le Monde DiplomatiqueThe NationAfrica is a Country, and openDemocracy.net. She is a recipient of the Miles Morland Foundation Writing Scholarship, and is at work on her first novel, The Interventionists.

Julia Duin is a Seattle-based journalist who has worked as a reporter or editor for everything from the Houston Chronicle to the Washington Times. She’s also written extensively for the Washington Post Sunday Magazine for which she just came out with a nearly 6,000-word profile on President Trump’s advisor Paula White. She’s published six books, the latest being In the House of the Serpent Handler, a nonfiction work about 20-something Appalachian pentecostal serpent handlers who use Facebook to publicize their exploits. During the 2014-2015 academic year, she occupied the Snedden chair as a journalism professor at the University of Alaska/Fairbanks.

We’ll be profiling all the recipients in more detail in the coming weeks.

The other finalists for the prize were (in alphabetical order):

Jane Affleck (Canada)
Michael Agugom (Nigeria)
Luís Roberto Amabile (Brazil)
Sarah Barnes (United States)
Odette Casamayor (United States)
Efemia Chela (South Africa)
Christy Chilimigras (South Africa)
Heather Delfs (Australia)
Judith Duncan (Australia)
Jacinta Escudos (El Salvador)
Lucy Grace (UK)
Anne Hamilton (UK)
Sean Kerr (Canada)
Mary-Ann Leeb (United States)
Amy J. E. MacKenzie (United States)
Joanne McClelland-Phillips (Australia)
Dora Mortimer (UK)
Daniel Musgrave (United States)
Diego Olavarría (Mexico)
Suyi Okungbowa (Nigeria)
Ash Parsons (United States)
Carien Smith (South Africa)

An additional ten people received “honorary mention”.

Iceland Writers Retreat Alumni Award: Applications now accepted!

Iceland Writers Retreat Alumni Award: Applications now accepted!

The Iceland Writers Retreat Alumni Award offers talented writers in need of financial support an opportunity to attend the Iceland Writers Retreat in Reykjavík, Iceland in April, 2018.

Who can apply

Anyone who is aged 18 or over on April 11, 2018 is eligible to apply. The winning candidate(s) must demonstrate that s/he does not have the financial means to attend the conference without this award.* Candidates do not need to be professional writers, but should be serious about the craft and interested in developing their skills and contacts. Their writing interests should fit well with the faculty for the 2018 retreat (i.e. literary fiction, non-fiction, memoir). For example, if you are primarily a poet, you should be clear in your application about why attending workshops that focus on literary fiction and non-fiction will be beneficial to you.

Family members of the judges and those who have already attended the IWR are not eligible to apply.*

What does it cover?

Entrants can apply for either full or partial funding. Full funding covers all participation in the Iceland Writers Retreat, as detailed on our website (including accommodation). The scholarship also includes round-trip flights to Iceland.

Partial funding covers the participant fee only, and neither accommodation nor round trip flights.

Please ensure that you apply for the most suitable category for you, as if you apply for full funding you are very unlikely to be considered for a partial award. (Note that last year we had many more applications for full funding than partial funding.)

The award does not include airport transfers, travel insurance, travel visas (if applicable)**, other incidentals or meals not listed in the itinerary, or the Relax & Write extension.

How will the recipients be chosen?

The recipients will be chosen based primarily on two factors: a) The potential s/he demonstrates (or has demonstrated) as a writer and b) his/her need for financial support to be able to attend. We will also evaluate based on the other questions in the application, though, so make sure to tell us about yourself and why you think you’d be the perfect match for the Iceland Writers Retreat.

The applicant should also be available for media interviews before and during the Retreat, and be able to explain how s/he would help to share their experience with others after the fact. This may include being asked to prepare a short report on their experience to be published on the IWR website.

Applications will be reviewed by a group of IWR alumni. The final decision on the award recipient will be made by the IWR Founding Directors.

Deadline for applications: Tuesday, 31 October, 2017. Midnight, PST. We will announce the recipients on 4 December, 2017. 

*If this financial stipulation does not apply to you, or if you have already attended the IWR, please consider entering our writing competition, which is open to all. We will provide details of this event on our website soon. It will open in early October.

**Please note that we are not responsible for issuing travel visas and cannot guarantee that one will be issued for you. However, we would provide all the required supporting letters and our past recipients who have required visas have had no problem being issued with one. 

Reykjavik pond ©RomanGerasymenko

General Tips for applying:

We receive a very large number of applications for the Iceland Writers Retreat Alumni Award. To increase your chances of being selected, please follow the application instructions very carefully.

  • Incomplete applications will not be considered.
  • It is not possible to make changes to your application once it has been submitted; you will receive email confirmation that your application has been received.
  • Level of funding: We receive far more applications for full funding than partial funding, but you need to show that you are unable to afford even the cost of flights to Iceland and accommodation while in the country. Note that you are very unlikely to be considered for partial funding if you have applied for full funding.
  • Your background: We welcome applications from people of all backgrounds and with all levels of writing experience. However, we are more likely to rank applications highly from people who have not had the opportunity to attend many other writing retreats. The quality of your writing is what is most important, whether you are just starting out, have been working for a while, or are at a mid- or post-career break.
  • Why do you want to attend? We all love Iceland. And we all love writing. If you are applying simply to get an opportunity to visit Iceland you are unlikely to be granted an award. Tell us why this particular event and this particular faculty have captured your interest. Show us that you have done some research about the Iceland Writers Retreat. Note especially that our workshops in 2018 focus primarily on literary fiction, non-fiction, and memoir. While we have all kinds of writers attend our event, and all of them get something out of it, if you are e.g. primarily a poet or a playwright, please be sure to explain exactly what you will get from workshops that focus on a different genre.
  • Writing samples: Note that the maximum length for each writing sample is 1000 words. We will not consider applications that have longer writing samples.
  • Why you need financial assistance: This is one of the most difficult yet important factors to consider for this award. Please be as honest as you can with us in explaining why this event is beyond your means without support. Your answer to the question about applying for additional funding is also important. We know that some countries offer support to writers who attend conferences, and we’d like to see if you have taken any initiative in terms of thinking broadly for ways in which you can attend.
  • How will you share your experience with others? We want many people to know about the Iceland Writers Retreat. How will you help us get the word out if you are awarded a scholarship? We know that social media is very popular. Do you have other, more original ideas too?
  • References: References should be by people who are familiar with your writing and are not family members. Applications without appropriate references will not be considered.

About the Iceland Writers Retreat

Held for the first time in April 2014, the Iceland Writers Retreat is an event comprised of a series of small-group writing workshops and cultural tours designed to introduce participants to Iceland’s rich literary heritage. Faculty in 2018 include Hilton Als, Hallgrímur Helgason, Priya Basil, Susan Shreve, Terry Fallis, and Gwendoline Riley. The Iceland Writers Retreat was named one of the world’s best writers’ retreats by the Sydney Morning Herald, and one of the top 10 “Events to travel for in 2014” by Four Seasons Magazine.

About the IWR Alumni Award

This is the third time the IWR Alumni Award has been granted. It is so named because it has been funded by former IWR participants. We are extremely grateful for their generosity.

Iceland Writers Retreat 074 © Roman Gerasymenko

The 2017 recipients of the Award were (from left) Akvile Buitvydaite, Victor Yang, Peter Ngila, and Nathan Ramsden.

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